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Tips for Checking Your Source

1. Apply the CRAAP Test

2. Google the topic or title of the article and/or the people the article discusses.  See what other sources are saying about it! 

3. Google the key facts.  Do other sources support what this article says? 

4. Visit Snopes.com, PolitiFact.com, or another fact-checking site to see if the article is "fake news"

5. Google "bad health websites" to see which sites other sources criticize for their health information

These tips aren't all fail-safe and some will be more helpful than others, given your particular situation, but they might just help you to avoid falling prey to "fake news" or misinformation. 

Article about Analyzing Fake Health News

Revealed: How dangerous fake health news conquered Facebook

This is the article where I found much of the information about the "fake news" or misinformation sites

ANSWER KEY 

Cancer Treatments - FAKE news / pseudoscience

Two separate website analysis tools reveal that the three articles here were each shared on Facebook over half a million times ! 

Links to website analysis tools with reports on articles "shares":

Buzzsumo web analysis tool (warning: the 2nd entry in this list uses some vulgar language)

SharedCount web analysis tool

Cancer articles - questionable / biased

Check out his credentials under the "About Dr. Axe" tab... (DNM, DC, CNS)  Says he founded the Exodus Health Center, which became one of the largest functional medicine clinics in the world. ???  When I Google Exodus Health Center, I find no results that are affiliated with his name. There is also an "Affiliate Links" disclaimer just below the title of the article, stating that Dr. Axe receives a commission from every product sold via one of the links on his page.  And the symbol (the one that looks like the upside down cross) after many of the statements in this article, lead to a footnote that "These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA..." 

Source = Yahoo Beauty!  Not the most reliable source for cancer treatment information. This is mostly one person's testimonial. Not much scientific information given about her cancer treatments, or proof that the photos are real.  When you click the link for the WRITER, you're linked to additional articles by her but not given any information about her credentials.  You can see, however, that she has published articles in several health and beauty related magazines, so editors have verified her articles to some extent.  She does cite credible sources, many of which are linked to within the article, so the reader can find out more. 

Good Cancer Articles

Excellent Online Cancer Resource

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